Ryan Herrington

 

Branden Grace finished T-34 on Sunday at the Alfred Dunhill Championship, shooting a one-under 287 for the week at Leopard Creek Golf Club, but it was as good as a victory for the 30-year-old South African. The finish, 13 strokes back of winner David Lipsky, in the last European Tour event of 2018 will likely be enough to keep him at the No. 48 spot in the World Ranking when the year’s final list comes out in two weeks.

And with that he’ll be playing in the Masters in April.

All players in the top 50 in the year’s final ranking earn invitations to compete at Augusta National Golf Club. Grace is one of 13 golfers in the projected top 50 who hasn’t already qualified for the first major of 2019.

Here’s a look at the projected final ranking of the year:

 

And here’s a list of the others that are projected to qualify who weren’t in the field already:

 

Alex Noren
Tyrrell Hatton
Rafa Cabrera-Bello
Eddie Pepperell
Kiradech Aphibarnrat
Matthew Fitzpatrick
Ian Poulter
Li Haotong
Thorbjorn Olesen
Matt Wallace
Lucas Bjerregaard
Emiliano Grillo
Branden Grace

No. 51 on the projected final ranking is Aaron Wise, who already is going to Augusta by virtue of his AT&T Byron Nelson win in May. Of those between Nos. 51 and 60, seven must now find another way to earn a spot into the Masters.

52 Ben An
53. Shugo Imahira
54. Brian Harman
56. Abraham Ancer
57. Luke List
59. Alexander Bjork
60. Daniel Berger

Between January and April, winners of any PGA Tour event awarding full FedEx Cup points will earn a spot. Also players inside the top 50 in the World Ranking a week before the Masters will be added to the field.

To those still on the outside looking in, best of luck gentlemen. You’ve got your work cut out for you.

 

Sourcewww.golfdigest.com

Sourcehttp://www.usga.org/

 

Celebrate the holidays with the 12 Days of Ukiah Valley Golf Course’s “Golf-mas”! 

Every day from Wednesday, Dec. 12 to Sunday, Dec. 23, we’ll have a different special available to help you give the perfect gift this Christmas!

Check in to find a new deal every day! Some specials are online and some are in-store.

Wednesday | Dec. 12

On the 1st day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

Titleist pro v1 and pro v1 x $39.99

Thursday | Dec. 13

On the 2nd day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

All golf bags 25% off

Friday | Dec. 14

On the 3rd day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

Buy 10 rounds receive 2 FREE!

Saturday | Dec. 15

On the 4th day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

Social Media Giveaway! Stay tuned.

Sunday | Dec. 16

On the 5th day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

Callaway Super Soft golf balls 2 dozen for $35

Monday | Dec. 17

On the 6th day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

25% off all clothing

Tuesday | Dec. 18

On the 7th day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

All ladies golf shoes in stock $69

Wednesday | Dec. 19

On the 8th day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

Adidas Clothing. mens or ladies 50% off

Thursday | Dec. 20

On the 9th day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

Social Media Giveaway! Stay tuned.

Friday | Dec. 21

On the 10th day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

Putters and wedges 25% off.

Saturday | Dec. 22

On the 11th day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

Purchase a $125 Gift Card for only $100!

Sunday | Dec. 23

On the 12th day of Golf-mas, my golf club gave to me…

Social Media Giveaway! Stay tuned.

$99 Shoe Gift Package

($150 Value)

(Mens and Ladies)

Package Includes:

  • pair of in-store golf shoes. Mens or ladies
  • 2 18 hole rounds of golf.
  • 1 large range basket.
  • 1 pairs of socks.

$99 Adidas Clothing Gift Package

($165 value)

(Mens and Ladies)

Package Includes:

  • 2 shirts or 1 shirt and 1 outerwear piece.
  • 2 18 hole rounds of golf.
  • 1 large range baskets.

Grab this great deal any time online from Thursday, November 22 to Sunday, November 25!

By 10 Rounds, Get 2 Free!

Senior 10 rounds:

$240 value for $200 Monday through Friday only.

Adult 10 rounds:

$288 value for $240 Monday through Friday only.

Sunset Annual Membership

Price: $600/year

Play anytime after 1pm November 1st – February 28th.

Play anytime after 2pm March 1st – October 31st.

Also receive 10% off non sale merchandise!

ONLY IN THE PRO SHOP:

We are open in the Pro Shop on Thanksgiving until 3pm! We will return to regular hours after the holiday.

Grab these great deals below from Thursday, November 22 to Sunday, November 25!

Ping Specials

Ping G400 DriverReg price $399 Sale Price $299. Excluding Max Driver.

Ping G400 Fairway. Reg Price $260 Sale Price $199

Ping G400 Hybrid. Reg Price $220 Sale Price $179

Special Titleist Holiday Offer

Pro V1 Holiday Promo: $39.99 per dozen! (Originally $52).

Limit 2 dozen per person. Sale is from Thursday 22nd though Sunday 25th.

Special Callaway Holiday Offer

 2 dozen Super Soft for only $35! (Regular price $48)

More Callaway….

Buy Chrome Soft & Chrome Soft X dozens for only $39.99!

(Original Price $46).

Questions? Give us a call at (707) 467-2832!

Remember when we said Andy Sullivan may have pulled off the shot of the year on the European Tour? Yeah, that lasted all of 10 minutes.

Sullivan’s driver-off-the-deck was no doubt impressive, but Eddie Pepperell topped it and then some moments later with a hole-in-one that is almost too impossible to be real. See for yourself:

https://twitter.com/EuropeanTour/status/1050390416221069312

How?! The ball bounces off the flag stick, away from the hole, lands and bounces back into the cup, defying all logic, physics, etc. Here’s a GIF you can watch on repeat forever while simultaneously questioning how this actually happened:

https://twitter.com/EuropeanTour/status/1050390416221069312

https://twitter.com/EuropeanTour/status/1050392280761282561

The ace came at the par-3 ninth at Walton Heath Golf Club, and it netted $20,000 for charity. A Sky Sports reporter caught up with Pepperell following the wild shot, and he was in top form as usual:

Pepperell has always been bluntly honest, so we wouldn’t be surprised if he really did wish there was a car to win instead, but we guess $20,000 to charity will do (we’re also kidding). How has the Englishman followed it up? How about with a birdie and an eagle to vault to the top of the leader board at six under:

 

That’ll do. The European Tour, so hot right now … the European Tour.

 

Source: golfdigest.com

Join us for a Par 3 Shootout at Ukiah Valley Golf Course! First 18 holes set up for par 3 play, final 9 holes will be net best ball from the white tees. Must be a Ukiah Men’s Golf Club Member at least 18 years of age with an established handicap index as of 9/1/18. Entry fee is $20.00 per player.

Team USA is full to the gunwales with talent, but there’s something a little strange about how that talent is currently performing. It turns out, through a fluke of bad luck, that three of the biggest American stars from the last two Ryder Cups happen to be showing the worst form of anybody on the 2018 team. That presents a problem, and it’s a thorny one for U.S. captain Jim Furyk.

Phil Mickelson, Patrick Reed, and Jordan Spieth were three of the top five points-earners in the 2016 victory at Hazeltine, and three of the top four at Gleneagles two years earlier. Spieth and Reed weren’t around at Medinah in 2012, but Mickelson was, and he was once again one of the team’s stars, netting three points in a dynamic pairing with Keegan Bradley. It just so happens that as the Americans get ready to do battle in Paris, hoping to win their first Ryder Cup on foreign soil in 25 years, these three U.S. stalwarts are playing some pretty rough golf. Along with Bubba Watson, they are—without a doubt—slumping in a way that the other eight players are not.

 

 

 

It had to be strange for Jim Furyk to see the bottom of the leaderboard at last weekend’s Tour Championship, where positions 28-30 in the 30-man field looked like this:

Patrick Reed: +9

Bubba Watson: +10

Phil Mickelson: +13

Spieth, whose troubles this year are well-chronicled, wasn’t even there—he’s made exactly one top ten since the Masters, and he didn’t qualify for the Tour Championship.

To add to the conundrum, Spieth and Reed are a famously strong pairing, having amassed a 4-1-2 record over the last two competitions. To break them up would be a dramatic, almost reactionary move, but keeping two ice-cold golfers together runs even greater risks. If they can’t re-discover their magic together, it’s like handing a free point to the Europeans.

As if the situation wasn’t tricky enough on its own, Thomas Bjorn made a very smart move by deciding to play four-ball in the Friday morning session. That means the alternate shot pairings will happen in the afternoon, and the last thing you want to do if you’re Jim Furyk is stick a struggling golfer out there in alternate shot, where he can’t be rescued by a hot partner and could potentially submarine an entire match.

This puts the stress squarely on Furyk’s shoulders. Assuming he’s trying to avoid playing his four coldest players in afternoon foursomes, it leaves two choices: He can either play Bubba, Phil, Spieth, and Reed in the morning, or sit them out for an entire day.

He can’t sit them for an entire day. It’s just not plausible, even if it’s arguably the smarter move on paper. As such, you can expect to see all four golfers on Friday morning. Judging by the Tuesday practice groups, Furyk may be planning to break up the band and have Spieth and Reed play with different partners—it may be that Spieth doesn’t want to play with him anymore, considering the “interesting” comments Reed has made this year, from the denied drop at Bay Hill (“I guess my name needs to be Jordan Spieth”) to the trash talk at the WGC-Match Play (“my back still hurts” from carrying Spieth at the Ryder Cup), all of which preceded Reed beating a frustrated Spieth at that WGC. Or maybe they’re completely fine. In any case, it’s easy to imagine Furyk seeing the benefit in giving himself other options if the two aren’t playing well on Friday morning.

But those other options carry a price, and that’s where diplomacy comes in. Patrick Reed wants to play all five sessions. The last time Phil Mickelson had an issue with playing time, he instigated a full mutiny and threw his captain to the wolves. Jordan Spieth is an immensely popular figure, to both his teammates and fans, and any attempt by Furyk to sideline him comes with risks. Of the four, only Bubba Watson—not a very popular figure, relatively speaking—is easily cast aside. Davis Love III felt no compunction at leaving him off the team in 2016, and Furyk can bench him without worrying about the consequences. Bubba even showed at Hazeltine in his vice captain role that he can be a team player under adverse circumstances.

When it comes to the other three, Furyk’s job gets tough. How do you manage those extremely large personalities? How do you disappoint them, in service of winning, and not risk a PR nightmare inside and outside the team room?

The answer comes down to personal management, of course, and there’s no way for anyone besides Jim Furyk to know exactly what notes to sing. Yet it’s an incredibly vital part of his job.

Paul McGinley had a terrific system in Gleneagles, when he paired Lee Westwood and Graeme McDowell with rookies Jamie Donaldson and Victor Dubuisson, respectively, and cast the veterans as sherpas whose role was to win foursomes points with their young charges. It worked, but it may not be the perfect model for Furyk, because Mickelson and Bubba are not playing well, and Bubba in particular is not well suited to being anyone’s guide. It looks like he might try out the shepherd strategy with Mickelson and Finau, but it would likely have to come in morning four-ball. The ideal situation is that they win, sit for the afternoon, and play again on Saturday morning, but that assumes that Finau doesn’t crack under the Ryder Cup pressure, and that Mickelson is happy with playing just one session per day.

As for Reed and Spieth, Furyk is mostly reduced to hoping for the best. If they struggle, he’ll have to deliver the bitter news and hope they’re both mature enough to accept an unlikely demotion.

Furyk is the rare golfer who thinks deeply about every question he’s asked, and brings a curious mind to his sport. Journalists love him, players respect him. He’ll be the same as captain, and you can bet he’ll have considered almost every angle on the course. His greatest challenge, though, will be managing expectations and personalities off the course, particularly when his team hits the inevitable patch of adversity. If he can’t prepare his struggling stars for the prospect of sitting out a crucial session—or perhaps an entire Saturday—he’s in trouble. He must discover how to make them accept his decisions with equanimity while remaining supportive of the team and staying inspired for Sunday singles. Otherwise, his exacting preparation will crumble around him.

There are extremely strong players on Team USA, and they need to be playing in the crucial moments. Identifying them is the easy part. Keeping everyone happy while making the tough choice is where the road gets rocky, and Furyk’s ability to solve this riddle could define the outcome of the Paris Ryder Cup.

 

Source: golfdigest.com

Golf is like sex. Some people do it for years and never improve. But why? With input from GOLF Magazine Top 100 instructor Jon Tattersall, we’ve drawn up a list of the 11 reasons why you may not be getting better at life’s (second) most enjoyable pursuit.

1. You never practice

You know that whole 10 thousand hours thing? How it takes at least that long to master a skill? Do the math. Ten minutes once a month isn’t going to get you there.

2. You practice unproductively

Smacking drivers on the range until you’re blue in the face might give you a backache. But it’s not going to get you where you want to go. What you need to do is practice with a purpose. “Go to the range to get better at one thing, posture for example,” Tattersall says.  “Once you’ve spent 30 minutes working on that and incorporating into your swing, leave the range.”

3. Your equipment isn’t optimized

“That includes your golf ball,” says Tattersall, who recommends getting your entire arsenal checked at least once a year.

4. You’ve got the wrong mix of clubs

News flash. You’ve got no business carrying a two-iron. You’re also probably not good enough to have more wedges than hybrids in your bag.

5. You don’t track your stats

You think you’re a great putter, and a middling driver. But are you really? Without knowing for sure, you can’t maximize your practice time, much less devise an optimal on-course strategy.

6. You’re not as good as you think you are

Two-twenty over water is not in your wheelhouse, but you always try it, because, well, your weakness is your fondness for the hero shot.

7. You’re too hard on yourself

On approach shots from 150 yards, the average Tour pro leave is 23 feet from the pin. But you somehow believe you should be knocking down the flagstick, so you berate yourself every time you don’t.

8. You ride a cart

You think you’re saving energy. What you’re really doing is losing touch with the natural rhythms of the game.

9. You think there’s a quick-fix

In a world filled with swing tips, you believe there’s a magic one that will solve all your problems. So you search, and search. You might as well be trying to track down Sasquatch, Tattersall says. “The tough news is it comes down to working on good principles long enough for them to become habits.”

10. You’re don’t hit it far enough

Sorry, but size matters. A good way to get better is to swing the club the faster to hit the ball longer. “Any good coach can correct crooked,” Tattersall says. “Getting the ball to go farther is a tougher task.”

11. You focus more on words than feel

You’ve gotten a lot of verbal instruction. But, Tattersall says, “Words don’t translate as well to performance.” Pay more attention to images and feels. It will free up your mind. And your swing.

Source: www.golf.com

Par 3 Shootout!

Join us for a Par 3 Shootout on Saturday, October 6th, 2018 starting at 8:00am. First 18 holes set up for par 3 play, final 9 holes will be net best ball from the white tees.

$20.00 entry fee & you must be a Ukiah Men’s Golf club Member at least 18 years of age with an established handicap index as of 9/1/18.

We look forward to seeing you there!

Women’s Equality Day

Our club provides a place for women to play, learn, and enjoy a lifelong involvement with golf.

Sunday, August 26

Enjoy a FREE cart rental with paid green fee for all women on Sunday, August 26!

Book a Tee Time

Skip the hassle of calling. Book your tee time online!